I.Q. of Famous People


RANDOM QUOTE: "You may say a cat uses good grammar. Well, a cat does?but you let a cat get excited once; you let a cat get to pulling fur with another cat on a shed, nights, and you´ll hear grammar that will give you the lockjaw. Ignorant people think it´s the noise which fighting cats make that is so aggravating, but it ain´t so; it´s the sickening grammar they use." --- Mark Twain

Dr David Livingstone

Born: 1813
Died: 1873
Nationality: Scotland
Description: Explorer & doctor
IQ: 170
Physician and missionary, David Livingstone (1813-1873) is also a Scottish explorer of great importance.

David Livingstone was born in Scotland on March 19, 1813 in Blantyre and grew up in poverty. He is obliged to work very early in a cotton factory to fulfill the requirement of his family but his child’s soul yearns for adventure. His intellectual qualities are noticed and allow him to conduct theology and medicine studies at the University of Glasgow. He then worked in London, where following the example of another Scots, Robert Moffat, he joined the London Missionary Society, and became an Anglican priest, realizing his dream of becoming a missionary.

In 1841 he was sent to Cape Town and then the Bechuanaland (Botswana) by the London Missionary Society. In 1844, he married the daughter of Robert Moffat, Mary, who will travel some time with him, despite her pregnancy and injunctions of her family. She finally returns to England with their child.

In 1849 he began to explore the south-central African continent. He crosses the Kalahari Desert to Lake Ngami. In the following years, he went up the Zambezi then joined the Atlantic coast to Luanda in Angola. He discovered the Zambezi Falls, which he names after the Queen Victoria. Through this expedition, he is probably the first European to have crossed Africa from west to east.

Livingstone went back on a mission in a more modest situation in 1866, around Lake Tanganyika in Tanzania, hoping to find the source of the Nile. Sick and abandoned by his holders, he completely loses touch with the outside world. He withdrew in Ujiji on the shores of Lake Tanganyika. he establishes at the time that the system of the Lualaba river, is not part of the Zambezi river system as it has long been thought, but he thought it could be linked to the source of the Nile.

Henry Morton Stanley, funded by the New York Herald newspaper in 1869, finally found in 1871. Their meeting and their maintenance are unforgettable, a classic in the history of exploration: Stanley asks "Doctor Livingstone, I presume?, Which responds" You made me a new life ", they then discuss what Livingstone has missed: the Franco-Prussian conflict, the Suez Canal, the transatlantic telegraph, and Livingstone accompanies Stanley for some time to explore the north of Lake Tanganyika, but refuses to follow him when Stanley returned to England. Their took different road in Unyanyembe.

Livingstone died on 1 May 1873 of dysentery on the shores of Lake Bangwelo in the current Zambia, always looking for the source of the Nile. An expedition repatriated his body to the United Kingdom where he will be buried the following year at Westminster Abbey.

    
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